If gaining U.S. citizenship is your goal, then you likely understand the time and extensive effort required to secure such a benefit. Thus, you probably look forward to being able to relax somewhat in Plano once the process ends. After all, once you are a naturalized citizen, it is impossible to take your citizenship away, right? 

That may not necessarily be true. Indeed, according to information shared by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, there are grounds for having your citizenship revoked. You may think this only occurs in extreme scenarios, yet that is not the case. 

Securing citizenship illegally

Some of the grounds for revocation may seem fairly obvious. For example, if you failed to meet the eligibility requirements for citizenship in the first place (yet failed to disclose this fact), you may have your citizenship revoked. Indeed, a failure to share pertinent information in your application for citizenship can merit revocation if the following occurs: 

  • You indeed misrepresented or concealed information 
  • This omission was willful 
  • The information you omitted was material 
  • The omission assisted in you securing citizenship 

Less obvious reasons for revocation

Affiliating yourself with certain groups can also lead to having your citizenship revoked. If you enter into affiliation with a communist organization, a totalitarian organization or an identified terrorist group within five years of becoming a naturalized citizen, authorities may revoke your citizenship. In addition, if your citizenship was due to military service, and your discharge was for reasons other than honorable service, you may lose your status as a citizen. Once again, the actions leading to your discharge needs to have occurred within five years of securing citizenship to qualify for revocation.