Most aspects of immigration law invoke hope and excitement in those involved with it; one area, however, can conjure up feelings of despair. This is due to the fact that while one works through the immigration process, the threat of deportation may be ever-present. 

People in Plano dealing with immigration issues typically understand what they need to do to avoid the threat of deportation: stay out of trouble with the law. Indeed, according to information shared by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office, of the almost 63,000 removal actions undertaken through the first quarter if 2019, over 40,300 involved some sort of criminal charge. However, that still leaves almost 20,000 removal cases due to some other immigration violation. 

Fighting deportation 

One facing deportation can challenge the charges against them. Successfully mounting such a challenge, however, may be difficult. A more likely path to deportation relief may come through applying for a deportation suspension. This would put any pending removal action on hold contingent on one’s conduct during the suspension period. In order to qualify for a suspension, one must prove to have maintained a consistent residence in the U.S. for at least 7-10 years prior to petitioning for suspension. 

Meeting the eligibility criteria 

Yet that is not the only requirement for separation suspension. Per the U.S. Department of Justice, one must have a history demonstrating good moral character during their time in the U.S. in order to qualify. In addition, one may show that their deportation could result in an undue hardship befalling a family member that has already attained citizenship or legal residency status. One might also seek a withholding of deportation if they would face life-threatening danger if forced to return to their country of origin.